Roman Holidays, Part I

St. Peter's at sunset from the Borghese Gardens.

St. Peter’s at sunset from the Borghese Gardens.

IMG_4108So you’ve heard about the Pope stepping down, and the Vatican subsequently being struck by lightning?  Super weird, huh?

No lightning when we were there in December.  It was business as usual, except that they were setting up St. Peter’s Square for New Year’s Mass.  Sorry, by the way, for the trite blog title.  Such a toss-up:  use the obvious and be a cliche? or skip it and wonder if people think it didn’t occur to you?

I snapped this when I noticed the sun illuminating the fountain-- I love that the Sister walked through as I snapped.

I snapped this with my iPhone when I noticed the sun illuminating the fountain– I love that the Sister walked through as I snapped.

It should have been obvious to us that the Vatican would draw a crowd at Christmas.  It was certainly obvious the minute we stepped into the Vatican Museums.  It was a little less magical than the first time we went there, when we went through with a guide who skillfully led us through ahead of the crowds and landed us in the Sistine Chapel before anyone else got there.  Twenty minutes alone with Michaelangelo… that was something.  This time we went on our own and, consequently, had to contend with the huge tour groups and the swell of people all pressing on to the same destination: that amazing painted chapel.  It’s 500 years old now, and I’ve read that they may have to start limiting the number of viewers, as all our breath and sweat are beginning to ruin the frescoes.

IMG_4092As we left the museum, we found ourselves exiting via a spiral staircase we hadn’t seen on our previous visit (because that fancy guide took us round by some private staircase used by people who have an audience with the Pope!).  My family patiently allowed me to send them ahead and make them pose for a photo on the spirals across from me.  They even stayed still long enough for me to zoom in so you can actually see them (but not the staircase– funny how that works– and I chose the picture that shows the staircase better).  But they weren’t patient enough to wait around while I tried to get a good shot of the tall Christmas tree in the center of the spiral.  I never did manage a great shot, but I did get a couple of angles to help me remember what struck me about the scene.  With my lack of technical skills in photography, that is usually what I have to aim for!

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There are just a few other things to see in Rome, of course…

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I think this photo credit actually goes to Clay.

IMG_4142We did hook into a tour for the Coliseum this time, because waiting in line on our own would have taken hours.  We listened and learned for a bit, and then went our own way after a while on the inside.  What a pleasure it was to turn our pasty winter faces to the sun for a few moments.  I could claim that we were imagining the scenes of old.  IMG_4141

But I might as well admit we were mostly soaking in some Vitamin D.  Although, I’m not sure what Quinn is doing in the picture– possibly shining Will’s Timberlands?  The littles were pretty into the Coliseum.  We read up on it– even the gory parts– in the “Not for Parents” Rome book they got for Christmas, and Quinn brought home one of those mini models.  I confess, one of us taught the 7-year-old to deliver the line, “Are you not entertained?” with exactly the right inflection while we were in the Coliseum.  I fear I will insult your cultural intelligence, but I can’t resist throwing out the question… Can you name the movie?

A favorite view from within the Coliseum.

A favorite view from within the Coliseum.

A favorite view into the Coliseum.

A favorite view into the Coliseum.

And then there is the Forum.

And then there is the Forum.

There’s so much more of Rome to tell.  Come back for another if you have the patience, and I’ll share some stories and photos of just being out and about in the city.  In the meantime, Arrivederci!